Skin Deep Beauty and How to Keep it

Skin Deep Beauty and How to Keep it

Soil has been likened to the skin covering our bodies. Both suffer serious erosion from wind, water and sun damage if left unchecked. Sandthorn is one of those rare plants which have proven to be very useful in landscape restoration and cosmetic   Skin Deep CBD    care of the skin.

Erosion Control
The Dust Bowl of the l930’s was the most tragic land calamity ever to strike the North American continent. Cattle overgrazing by ranchers and over farming by sodbusters removed virtually all of the grasslands from America’s prairies, leaving the unprotected soil to periodic rain washouts and frequent driving winds.

A story circulating in those days told of an old Nebraska farmer sitting on his front porch during a horrendous dust storm. When asked what he was watching so intently, he drolly replied, “Oh, I’m just counting them Kansas farms as they go flying by.”

Such are the ways of erosion when the land isn’t properly cared for as it should be. Similar examples have been found in northern China, Pakistan and portions of the Indian subcontinent, where the systematic removal of old growth forests and the continuous under plowing of surface ground have caused serious soil
erosions and landslides.

But agronomists soon discovered that the sandthorn shrub was extremely useful in helping bind earth and for good soil conservation measures; hence, millions of acres were eventually replanted with it.

The Living Barrier
Just as soil covers much of the ground we walk in, so does another type of material protect the delicate inner parts of our bodies against wear and tear, knocks and physical damage, and extremes of temperature. Skin is the body’s largest and heaviest organ. It covers almost 21½-square feet (2 square meters) on an adult around 9 to 15 pounds (4 to 7 kilograms), representing about one-twelfth of the body’s total weight. If you’ve ever worn an overcoat that heavy, then you would begin to appreciate how heavy your skin is.

Like a shower proof raincoat skin keeps out most of the water and other fluids to which it is exposed, although it is not fully waterproof. Water is repelled by the natural oils and waxes made in the tiny sebaceous glands just under the surface of the skin. These sebaceous products also keep the skin flexible arid supple.

Skin insulates the body too. Underneath is a soft, yellowish layer called subcutaneous fat. It works like the padding in a quilted coat to keep the body warm and also absorbs knocks and bumps.

The world is full of microscopic germs. They float in the air and lie on the things we touch. Even objects that are apparently clean have germs on or in them.

Skin prevents germs from entering the body. Under a microscope, the skin’s surface shows many dead, flattened cells that interlock and overlap tightly, like tiles on a roof. Few germs can penetrate this barrier, which completely covers healthy skin. But they can enter the body through cuts or breaks in the skin.

The natural waxes and oils on the skin’s surface contain germ-killing chemicals. These are the body’s own disinfectants, giving added protection against bacteria, yeasts, and other potentially harmful microscopic organisms.

Dermatological Miracle
The landscape of the skin, much like that of the earth1 undergoes numerous transformations over a lifetime. It experiences different types of erosions brought on by the elements of weather, poor diet, emotional upset, overuse of chemical cosmetics, and gradual aging.

Two types common to many older people are rosacea and eczema. The first condition is characterized by dilation of the facial capillaries, acne like pimples, and sometimes thickened skin on the nose. Certain foods – such as tea, coffee, alcohol, and those that are spicy – are associated with worsening of rosacea. A recent study indicates that the heat in coffee or tea may be responsible.

 

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